Japanese knotweed (Fallopia japonica) AND OTHER invasive area plant species: NOT FUTURE HERITAGE PLEASE!

Posted on August 25, 2015

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THIS ITEM ON INVASIVE PLANTS IS IMPORTANT, SO IT HAS CREPT IN BETWEEN THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL LAYERS OF THIS BLOG, JUST AS IT WOULD DO IN REALITY.TO BUILDINGS, WALLS ETC……………………….

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JAPANESE KNOTWEED IN COUNTY CORK (Fallopia japonica).

EXCERPTS SEEN BELOW ARE taken from THE excellent work of  FINBAR WALLACE and ISOBEL ABBOTT, ‘CORK INVASIVE ALIEN PLANT SPECIES SURVEY’:

http://corkinvasivealienplantsurvey.org/

“Because Invasive Alien Species are recognised as such a threat to biodiversity and to human welfare – in terms of health and economy- legal measures have been put in place at international, European and Irish levels in an effort to deal with the threat.

Perhaps the most important recent Irish legislation is European Communities (Birds and Natural Habitats) Regulations 2011.

Two sections of these regulations place strict controls on the introduction, dispersal, trade and keeping of certain species identified as particular problems.

Regulation 49: prohibition on introduction and dispersal of certain species.

Regulation 50: prohibition on dealing in and keeping certain species.

The species covered by the regulations are listed in the Third Schedule of the regulations and include many of the plant species covered by Cork Invasive Alien Plant Species Survey.

Winter heliotrope (Petasites fragrans), Old man’s beard (Clematis vitalba) and Garden yellow archangel (Lamiastrum galeobdolonssp. argentatum) are not included in the Third Schedule.

Bohemian knotweed (Fallopia x bohemica)  is not included in the Third Schedule but is covered by the regulations as it is a hybrid of two Third Schedule species, Giant knotweed (Fallopia sachalinensis)  and Japanese knotweed (Fallopia japonica).

Some European legislation that specifically relates to Invasive Alien Species or contains references to their control or management include:

EU Regulation No 1143/2014 on the prevention and management of the introduction and spread of invasive alien species.

EU Regulation 708/2007 concerning the use of alien and locally absent species in aquaculture.

Environmental Liability Directive 2004/35/EC.

Strategic Environmental Assessment Directive 2001/42/EC.

Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC.

EU Wildlife Trade Regulation 338/97.

Habitats Directive 92/43/EEC.

Environmental Impact Assessment Directive (EIA) 85/337/EEC (as amended).

Wild Birds Directive 79/409/EEC.

Internationally, one of the most important legal instruments covering Invasive Alien Species is the Convention on Biological Diversity. Ireland is a party to the convention, which has a programme directly dedicated to Invasive Alien Species.

Another relevant international convention to which Ireland is a contracting party is the International Plant Protection Convention.”

WHAT SPECIES ARE WE SURVEYING? and 

WHY THESE SPECIES?

Japanese knotweed (Fallopia japonica)
Giant knotweed (Fallopia sachalinensis)
Bohemian knotweed (Fallopia x bohemica)
Himalayan knotweed (Persicaria wallichii)
Himalayan balsam (Impatiens glandulifera)
Winter heliotrope (Petasites fragrans)
Old man’s beard (Clematis vitalba)
Garden Yellow archangel (Lamiastrum galeobdolon ssp. argentatum)
Most are incredibly invasive.
Some are controlled by legislation – Japanese knotweed, Giant knotweed, Bohemian knotweed, Himalayan knotweed, Himalayan balsam.
Some are likely to occur in Cork city but may have been mis-identified – Giant knotweed, Bohemian knotweed.
One has been little surveyed as an invasive alien species- Garden Yellow archangel.
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