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CAHIRVAGLIER FORT, NEAR COPPEEN

My favourite Archaeological Monument, CAHIRVAGLIER FORT, NEAR COPPEEN

CAHERVAGLIER, NEAR COPPEEN

CAHERVAGLIER

In 2012 I set up this blog, Cork Archaeologist with the assistance of my good friend Margaret Jordan, genealogist. I have found  its production exceedingly rewarding. It has reminded me of all of the good times, interesting work, places and people, whom I have encountered in my career as an archaeologist/physical anthropologist. Although I have published in books, journals, both nationally and internationally, the web is another popular means which will give access to many other projects etc, in which I have been involved.  I have included a mix of archaeology and physical anthropology. I would hope that this data will be of use to the general public and will benefit many, as well as simply being an interesting site to browse. One of my main intentions in every job I undertook, was to inform the public. I also hope to include a gallery of photographs of a variety of Archaeological Sites and Monuments, in Cork County, with which I am very familiar, but which others may not be. After all, archaeology is heritage for everyone, not just for archaeologists.

When I was growing up, I had a great interest in history, archaeology and languages.  My father Joe encouraged my education and interest in the past.  For a long time, I also wanted to be an airline pilot. However, I found it easier to become an Archaeologist in a time when there was only a handful of such jobs throughout Ireland, but no female airline pilot position. Prior to that I wanted to be an Olympic champion. I was influenced here by my father, who also was  a great junior runner. As a junior athlete, a record breaker, with All Ireland, Munster and Cork and Waterford County medals, it was connections rather than talent that I required in those days,  as did many other athletes. A time of 12.2 seconds for the 100m, 27.7 seconds for 200m and 58.8 seconds for 400m at the age of 12 years did not help get me to a European games in Lisbon, not to mind obtain my first dream, of the Olympics. No one assisted myself and some fellow athletes, when seeking help.

As an archaeologist, I believed in doing what I enjoyed and began a wonderful career that never left me bored; it resulted  in many friends, meeting genuinely lovely people and travelling to strange and wonderful places. It gave me much knowledge, but with hard work. During an end of year school talk to the students at the Loreto Convent, Youghal some years ago, one of the girls asked me how she could decide on which career to pursue. I simply suggested that a good start was choosing the subjects that you enjoy. At the conclusion of that same lecture, the Chairperson of the Parents’ Committee (with whom I had been in primary school), Dorothy Heaphy, an undertaker, said that as she was burying people, I was digging them up!

 

 

1985 st mary's collegiate church

kanturk castle

 

Trying to save archaeology and alter people’s mind on the viability of the subject, which I was continually told was coffee-table talk, was at times difficult but a rewarding challenge, in particular in a society which is to a large degree money-driven, and of course, in many ways necessarily so.  Today the nation is well versed in how archaeology is of great financial use for tourism, job creation, national pride etc. In 1980, I received a degree in Archaeology, Classical Greek, Italian and History, and subsequently received a Masters Degree at University College Cork in the subject of Dental Anthropology. The assistance which I received from the Department of Anatomy, UCC was invaluable, especially from Dr. Robin O’Sullivan (now Professor of Anatomy in the Medical University of Bahrain), who took me under his wing.  Robin taught a number of lectures on the subject of physical anthropology in the Anatomy Department in UCC.  I was the first person in Ireland to receive a degree in Physical Anthropology. Subsequently I was the first person to develop a course on the subject in Archaeology  in Ireland; this iniative was suggested by former far-thinking Professor of Archaeology, Peter Woodman. The course, called Palaeodemography, was set up in the late 1980’s in the Department of Archaeology, University College Cork.  I continued teaching and developing this course until I took up the role of Cork County Archaeologist, in 2000 (another first position). I had also set up a collection of archaeological human remains in the Department of Archaeology. At UCC, I taught the study of human remains to undergraduate years, as well as the Master’s course, which included a number of research theses on human remains and archaeology. Two colleagues, Margaret McCarthy (zooarchaeologist) and John Tierney (environmental analyst), and I set up the Archaeological Services Unit in the Department of Archaeology. This Unit provided jobs and research for the Department of Archaeology, UCC for about 14 years.

 

A RURAL C0TTAGE IN NORTH CORKA RURAL COTTAGE

 

During my years at the Department of Archaeology, UCC, I was awarded a number of scholarships to study physical anthropology abroad, cremation techniques, at the Department of Archaeological Sciences, Bradford/Leeds, England; Forensic Anthropology in the Medical School, Brest, France, a palaeopathology course, and later work on microwear in North American Aboriginal populations at the Natural History Department at the Smithsonian Institution, as well as short work experiences at Hambledon Hill, Dorset for Edinburgh University, Scotland, Assendelfter Polder with the Institut of Archaeology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands and bone isotope analysys at the Department  of Anthropology, University of Wisconsin , Madison. It was a priviliged time. Later I received many grants for research on human remains from Waterford, Cork, Limerick, and Belfast. I spent long research stints at the Ulster Museum, Belfast, the National Museum of Ireland, and also with the Department of the Environment of Northern Ireland, and the Office of Public Works. I also lectured on my work from schools in Perth, Australia to Colaiste Choilm, Ballincollig,  Universities in London, Galway and Belfast. I was always giving talks on my work to a wide variety of groups, such as the Albrin Society in Youghal,  to TV programmes, tours to the Cork Archaeological and Historical Society  etc.

 

 

PLATE III. THE OPENING ON THE FRONT LEFT PART OF THE CRANIUM OF AN ADULT MALE FROM ST. MARY’S OF TH ISLE, CORK.

THE OPENING ON THE FRONT LEFT PART OF THE CRANIUM OF AN ADULT MALE CAUSED BY TREPANATION SURGERY IN MEDIEVAL TIMES.

 

 

I also worked for Cork Corporation from 1996 to 2000, as director of archaeological excavations in the historic centre of Cork City and suburbs, as well as the Blackpool Bypass at the same time.  We carried out excavations on most of the streets of Cork, prior to a new drainage system being installed into the City of Cork. A synopsis of the work is included in this blog. Castles, city walls, culverts, laneways etc were some of the discoveries.

As Cork County Archaeologist, I curated all monuments in the County, dealt with planning applications involving monuments, gave advice to other Council departments, as well as on the conservation of churches, graveyards, castles etc. I met with schools, campaigners, community groups, from Tracton, to Churchtown North to the Beara Peninsula and to Ballincollig, to advice on setting up archaeological groups, to record graves in burial grounds, to obtain funding for conservation, to educate about archaeology, to organise heritage week, to battle campaigns to save historic sites,  to give lectures, to set up projects and plans and much more. An enjoyable but enormous task, with a lot of red tape constantly working against heritage. County Cork has an enormous amount of interest in heritage today, evidenced by the many groups involved in Heritage Week each August. My early campaigns with An Taisce Corcaigh and Youghal Heritage Society in Youghal, stopped the demolition of many archaeological sites, one is the College Gardens, now used for Heritage Week every year; in 1992 it was given planning for housing by Youghal Urban District Council! Thanks go to artist Walter Verling who did amazing work which helped stop that planning. It is also probably the site of a pre town walls defence, which I had partially excavated in 1992. Excavations in Youghal took place regularly after that including Chapel Lane’s medieval houses, and today’s work by archaeologist Dan Noonan on the drainage scheme in Youghal. In 1993 I was awarded The Community Person of the year in Youghal for my efforts.

1985 youghal town walls viewed from the graveyard of st. mary's collegiate church

 

 

feb 28 20 kilcredan , 009

 

My work with Cork County Council as their archaeologist was another window into a new stance on  archaeology and a local authority (I had previously worked as a consultant, for Kerry and Waterford County Councils, the OPW etc). Instead of being on the outside as a campaigner, I was now working with the bureaucrats, all with their own ideas, not always the legislative way. The survey and conservation of churches and graveyards was carried out with the archictect John Ludlow, archaeologists Eamon Cotter and Bernard O’Mahony, and  the backing of the exceptional Historic Monuments Advisory Committee comprising Bill Power, Seamus Crowley, David Kelly, and Mick Monk, they were way ahead with their regard and work for the conservation of church buildings etc. Another wonderful team was the Cork Archaeological Survey, who were all on-hand for advice and access to their files, in particular Elizabeth Byrne, Ursula Egan, Sheila Ronan,and Denis Power.  Other projects which I assisted in their infancy included the building of a new museum with Kimurry, the walking routes of Beara Way; assisting the historian Michael Martin with the conference on Spike Island; the funding of the conservation of the Bell Tower in Waterloo, Blarney; the renovation of Camden Fort, Crosshaven, the plan for Lonehort, on Bere Island, a plan for the protection of St. Gobnait’s church, graveyard and bridge etc.

From 2000 until my early retirement in 2011 the change in attitude and legislation for the protection and conservation  of archaeology throughout the public sector and the public itself is amazing. There are now guidelines for work in graveyards, plans for working on conservation, planning etc. To think that I assisted in some way in the protection of Ireland’s archaeological heritage is very satisfying.

I have started a new chapter in my life. I had my first book ‘Short Stories’ launched on 30th September 2015, by Marty Morrissey at Waterstones, Patrick Street, Cork.

 

 

 

 

 

 

WATSON'S STAIN GLASS MAKERS LOCATION ON CATHERINE STREET, YOUGHAL, EARLY 1990'S NO 2 SLIDE

location of  business of WATSON’S STAIN GLASS MAKERS ON CATHERINE STREET, YOUGHAL, EARLY 1990’S

 

 

 

BALLINACARRIGA CASTLE 16TH CENTURY TOWER HOUSE NEAR BALLINEEN 001.jpg

BALLINACARRIGA CASTLE, A SIXTEENTH CENTURY  TOWER HOUSE, LOCATED NEAR bALLINEEN.

 

 

BELOW THE ASGARD IS SEEN IN YOUGHAL BAY, ON ITS VISIT IN 1984, SURROUNDED BY  A FLOTILLA OF LOCAL SAILING BOATS..

THE CELTIC CROSS WHICH MARKS THE ARCTIC EXPLORER JEROME COLLIN’S GRAVE AT CURRAGHKIPPANE. CORK COUNTY COUNCIL REPAIRED IT, TO STOP IT FALLING DOWN A SLOPE.

 

 

34-300x225THE AUTHOR WITH FORMER CORK CITY LORD MAYOR, DARAGH MURPHY AT CITY HALL WHERE THE EXHIBITION CELEBRATING CORK PAST WAS HELD IN 2009.

 

 

© 2012-2016 Catryn Power All Rights Reserved

46 Responses “HOME” →
  1. Catryn
    Good Luck with your new Blog.
    Kevin Terry

    Reply
  2. Hi .Catryn
    Best of luck in your new role. It is good to keep busy. Thanks again for all your help and advise.

    Reply

  3. Jerry Aherne

    January 19, 2012

    Greetings Catryn,
    It is great to see you and your wonderful talent sharing some of your many archaeological experiences with us here. I have added you to the top of my favourites and I shall look in very regularly to a feast of new article by you. Best of luck always
    Jerry Aherne

    Reply
  4. Catryn, you are, and always be an absolute hero to all of us in the Coppeen Archaeological, Historical & Cultural Society (CAHCS) Whenever we needed help or advise you always came up trumps. All our local archaeological gems such as Cahirvagliair, Kinneigh, Leabaowen, etc have a special sparkle thanks to you! Míle buicas Catryn for all the hours you’ve spent with us, and all the very best for the future. You’ll always be as welcome as the flowers of May in Coppeen! (and everywhere else too I’m sure) This blog deserves to be the best in the land.
    Colum Cronin

    Reply

  5. Bernard O'Mahony

    January 29, 2012

    Bets of luck Catryn. Thanks for all your help and support in the past

    Reply

  6. angela power-leach

    February 4, 2012

    Best of luck with the new site.

    Angela

    Reply
  7. Your blog is going to be a great resource for us all. Good luck in your new role. Hoping you will be visiting Goleen and the Mizen sometime. Thank you for your help with our projects. All the best,
    Sue
    Sue Hill

    Reply

  8. Anthony Beese

    February 23, 2012

    Just found your website Catryn, via the Cork City stuff. Looks good.

    Reply

  9. Stegen waugh

    February 29, 2012

    Best of luck with the new blog catryn,it will be a great source of info for cork archaeology

    Steven

    Reply
  10. Best Wishes for your new career avenue! Roger…

    Reply
  11. This I have just stumbled across during research for lectures across Cadw sites across Wales, What a fab resource, may i reference you in biblography recommendations to students to visit this website/blog of yours?
    Regards
    Ceri (Celtic Learners Network)

    Reply

  12. Ann Molony

    August 16, 2012

    Hi Catryn, every good wish with your new blog. Ann Molony

    Reply
  13. ca tryn,how can i get your recent book in the USA.?paradise regained,who is it published by?

    Reply
    • hi Margaret,

      great to hear from you; Paradise Regained is a lecture which I gave to the Youghal Celebrates History Conference this past September; so it’s not a book. Youghalonline asked me to do a summary of that lecture. I don’t know if I can be of any further help, let me know if I can. If you would like me to put some photos to you by email, or on this blog site, I can, no problem.

      all the best,

      Catryn

      Reply
      • hi Margaret
        in the above message, 2012, you asked about a book. Can I send you a copy of my first book, 3 plus due out in next 12 months.? no cost to a Youghal person..
        my email is catrynpower@hotmail.com

        catryn

    • hi Margaret

      I NOW HAVE MY FIRST BOOK PUBLISHED, I OF 4 IN THE NEXT 12 MONTHS.

      I CAN SEND A COPY TO YOU, NO COST. MY EMAIL IS catrynpower@hotmail.com, if you wish to give me your postal address. hope all is well.

      catryn

      Reply

  14. Mike O'Reilly

    January 23, 2013

    I was reading up on the Knights Templars in Ireland – Ballintemple, on the road to Blackrock must refer to a temple? Temple Hill, in Ballintemple, has an old burial site and the original Temple Hill house was built on a very old structure – any views?

    Reply
    • hi MIke

      Ballintemple, originally a village outside of Cork City, gets its name from ‘Baile na Teampaill’, meaning ‘town of the Church’. There remains a small graveyard enclosed by a wall, which was associated with the church. The burial ground and church also gave the name to Churchyard Lane. The church probably dated to the 12th century, and there may well have been an earlier monastic settlement on the site. Also the name Boreenmanna Road means ‘the little road of the monks’. Human skeletal remains have frequently been found in the immediate area, including, I believe in the area of Temple Hill House, in the past.
      In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the wealthy of Cork moved to the more fashionable suburbs such as Ballintemple, Blackrock etc. I am not familiar with the history of Temple Hill House, but it may well have been built during that period.
      I hope this answers your query.

      Reply

  15. michael oreilly

    January 24, 2013

    Hi,
    I found a reference to a Knights templar church being built in ballintemple in 1392.
    I lived in temple Hill house from 1950 to 1961 and am now sure this was the site of the church.
    The road leading from ther property is called boreenamanna road and leads to the city centre.
    Also the actual area has a french name, Beaumont.
    I have tried to get more details from cork city archaeology Dept but cannot make contact.
    Do you have any sources?
    regards,
    Mike

    Reply
    • hi Mike

      Eamon Cotter, who excavated Mourne Abbey, will contact you by email re Ballintemple.

      good luck with the research.

      Reply
    • Catryn, Was Temple Michael a Knights Templar site? Ann

      Reply
      • Thanks Ann, for your query. Documentary evidence is scarce for the Knights Templar in Ireland.There is no evidence to suggest that Templemichael was associated with the Knights Templar. The site of Templemichael is earlier than the time of the Knights Templar. The ruins at a nearby site at Rhincrew, are believed to be a Preceptory of the Knights Templar. These heavily overgrown ruins include a vaulted ceiling and possibly part of part of a refectory and claustral buildings. Do let me know if you have any further queries. Catryn


  16. Eamonn Cotter

    January 27, 2013

    Hi Michael,

    It is a common enough mistake to assume that the word ‘temple’ in a placename signifies an association with the Templars. However it could also derive from the Irish word ‘teampaill’, one of several Irish words for a church, and found in Ireland long before the Templars.

    The site at Ballintemple is listed in the Archaeological Inventory of County Cork, vol. 2 page 257, available in most libraries. Or you can check it online at http://webgis.archaeology.ie/NationalMonuments/FlexViewer/ When the map comes up zoom into the area you want. The entry there suggest the church was in the graveyard. It quotes a statement by the Cork antiquarian Windele, writing in 1844, that the church was built by the Templars in 1392, which seems to be the reference you have. This cannot be correct, since the Templars were suppressed in 1312. Also check the reference to the church in ‘A history of the Diocese of Cork from the earliest times to the Reformation’ by Evelyn Bolster, page 134. This should be available in the County and City libraries. Bolster states that the Knights Hospitallers (not the Templars) had lands in the Blackrock area. Another possibility is that there was an Irish church/monastic site there in pre-Norman.

    Hope this helps.

    Eamonn Cotter
    Consultant Archaeologist/Heritage Consultant

    Reply
  17. Does anyone remember or know if some of the gravestones were moved from Ballintemple Graveyard?

    Reply

  18. Margaret Garvey

    January 15, 2014

    Hi Catryn

    What a great site. Cahervaglier is our favourite site too!
    Keep up the good work.

    Mags n Mike

    Reply
    • many thanks, Mags and MIke

      CAHERVAGLIER IS AN AMAZING PLACE
      EVERYONE INTERESTED IN ARCHAEOLOGY SHOULD VISIT IT, ON A DRY DAY, EVEN THOUGH WE WOULD ALSO LIKE TO KEEP IT TO OURSELVES.

      Reply

  19. Marian Crowley

    April 1, 2014

    Hi Catryn,
    I look forward to dropping in now and again. Congratulations!
    Marian

    Reply

    • garvey.mags@gmail.com

      April 1, 2014

      Well done, just popped in there myself. D’ya know, you’re a national treasure! You know so much of the origins and stories of places, I envy you! Keep up the good work and never lose your interest and knowledge, you are far too valuable.

      Love Mags

      Sent from my iPad Mags

      >

      Reply
  20. I still treasure our visit to Cahervaglier, Catryn. No wonder it’s your favourite site and so well hidden! I look forward to dipping into the site now that I’ve left Ireland.

    Reply
  21. thanks Jenny
    hopefully on your frequent visits, I can bring you to further hidden gems……….I have a long list awaiting…………..all the best

    Reply

  22. Patrick Gunn

    July 28, 2014

    Regarding Carr’s Hill Graveyard the Cork City and County Famine Group have been working on this issue since 2008 and have made some progress with the HSE and the County and City Councils over the years. There is an annual commemoration ceremony held at ST. Joseph’s Cemetery each year and this year’s will be held on Sunday 24th August at 3pm.

    Reply
  23. IT IS A GREAT IDEA. AS WELL AS THE RELIGIOUS, IT IS ALSO A GATHERING OF MANY PEOPLE WHO STUDY THE FAMINE PERIOD, CEMETERIES, CORK HISTORY & GENEALOGY, ETC. ST. JOSEPH’S IS A FASCINATING CEMETERY.

    Reply

  24. mary o regan

    September 11, 2014

    Hi Catryn i live near mallow cork,how would i go about getting information for a ring fort in my back yard i would love to get documentation on its history mary o regan

    Reply
    • hi Mary

      if you wish to tell me which townland it is, I can look it up for you, and explain how to do that; best to do it through email;
      or I can tell you how to do it yourself, via this blog?

      Reply
  25. hi MARY.
    YOU CAN DO ONE OF TWO OF THE FOLLOWING TO FIND OUT ABOUT THE RINGFORT IN YOUR TOWNLAND:
    1.
    GO TO THE LIBRARY, LOOK UP THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF COUNTY CORK, VOLUME 4, PARTS 1 & 2, NORTH CORK; YOU CAN LOOK UP THE SECTION ON RINGFORTS (PAGES 217 TO 358 IN PART 1), AND SOME MAY BE CALLED ENCLOSURES ON (PAGES 389 TO 430), AND LOOK UP THE TOWNLAND ON WHICH YOU WANT INFORMATION; THERE MAY BE A FEW RINGFORTS IN THE ONE TOWNLAND; THIS WRITTEN SECTION WILL GIVE YOU MAP REFERENCE NUMBERS; THE MAPS ARE AT THE END OF THE BOOK, WHERE YOU SHOULD FIND THE RINGFORT;
    RINGFORTS THAT HAVE BEEN EXCAVATED CAN GIVE YOU MORE INFORMATION; THIS MAY BE INDICATED IN THIS BOOK. SOMETIMES THERE IS ONLY A BRIEF FEW LINES ON THE APPEARANCE OF THE RINGFORT. LITTLE ELSE IS KNOWN ABOUT IT.
    2.
    ALTERNATIVELY, YOU CAN LOOK UP THE FOLLOWING SITE ONLINE:
    http://www.archaeology.ie/NationalMonuments; UNDER THE SECTION ‘protection of archaeological heritage’ and under this CLICK ON Archaeological Survey Database;
    A QUERY DATABASE BOX WILL APPEAR, FILL IN THE COUNTY, THE NEAREST TOWN, AND THE TOWNLAND, AND ALSO ONE OF THE FOLLOWING RINGFORT CASHEL, RINGFORT-RATH, OR RINGFORT-CLASSIFIED.
    IN YOUR CASE LOOK UP THE NEAREST TOWN, MALLOW, AND IT LISTS THE TOWNLANDS OF BALLYELLIS WITH TWO RINGFORT; CASTLELANDS WITH 3 RINGFORTS, AND GORTNAGRAIGA WITH ONE. YOU WILL THEN SEE A MAP ON SCREEN. THE NUMBERS GIVEN TO EACH RINGFORT ON THE DATABASE QUERY BOX WILL BE EVIDENT ON THE MAP, WHICH WILL DISPLAY SMALL DOTS WHERE EACH RINGFORT/MONUMENT IS LOCATED. WHEN ONE CLICKS ON THE DOT SOME INFORMATION WILL APPEAR ON ANOTHER WINDOW.
    DURING THE CELTIC TIGER, A NUMBER OF RINGFORTS WERE DAMAGED BY OWNERS/CONSTRUCTION COMPANIES IN THE MALLOW AREA; SOME WERE ALSO EXCAVATED. THE LOCAL COUNCIL OFFICE SHOULD HAVE INFORMATION ON THESE.
    DON’T FORGET TO ALSO LOOK UP RINGFORTS-UNCLASSIFIED IN THE DATABASE QUERY BOX.

    Reply

  26. Pat Doody

    August 9, 2015

    Good luck with the blog Catherine.
    Pat Doody

    Reply

  27. John McCarthy

    September 18, 2015

    Hi – I’ve been trying to find out more about the Knights Templar fort at Ringcrew outside Youghal, with little luck – not even when it was thought to be built. Do you have any ideas or sources ?
    Thanks John McCarthy

    Reply
    • hi John,

      I WILL PASS YOUR QUERY ON TO eAMON COTTER, AN ARCHAEOLOGIST WITH AN INTEREST IN RINCREW.

      you might also look at the Mourne Abbey site in this Blog, also reputedly The Knights Templar site. see under https://corkarchaeologist.wordpress.com/about/excavations/
      EAMONN COTTER EXCAVATED PART OF MOURNE ABBEY.

      HERE IS EAMONN COTTER’S REPLY

      Hi John,

      There is no historical evidence to place the Templars at Rincrew, only antiquarian speculation, and it is virtually certain they were never there. Tadhg O’Keeffe, Paul MacCotter and myself have recently co-authored a paper arguing that Rincrew was in fact a secular manorial centre. The paper will be published in next year’s Journal of Irish Archaeology. The Archaeological Survey of Ireland record of the site gives you a description of the buildings. If you follow the references there you will see they are all antiquarian assumptions, with no genuine historical sources.

      Kind Regards,

      Eamonn

      HI JOHN

      A GOOD WEBSITE TO LOOK UP IS http://www.archaeology.ie. COUNTY WATERFORD. TEMPLEMICHAEL BELOW.
      IT IS HAS A TOWER HOUSE, BAWN, AND ANOTHER STRUCTURE. I INCLUDED THE TOWER HOUSE HERE AND THE WEB SITE WILL GIVE YOU INFORMATION ON THE OTHERS.
      NEARBY TWO SITES OF CHURCH AND GRAEYARD, ALSO BELOW.

      TOWER HOUSE/’CASTLE’
      Description: Located on the E side of a short promontory (dims. c. 260m E-W at S; c. 200m N-S) jutting N into the confluence of the W-E Glendine River with the N-S Blackwater River. This is a Fitzgerald tower house that was probably built in the 16th century, and two lords of Decies died there, Gerald Fitzgerald of Dromana (WA029-021001-) in 1553, and his grandson, Gerald of Dromana in 1598. Templemichael was owned by the widow of Garret Fitzgerald in 1640 (Simington 1942, 21). It was apparently attacked by Cromwell in 1649 (O’Connell Redmond 1918, 94-5).

      It is a rectangular tower (ext. dims. 12.05m E-W; 10.4m N-S) of five floors with E-W barrel vaults over the first and third floors. Only the E and S walls survive complete with a base-batter and cut-stone quoins. A rebuilt lintelled entrance towards the N end of the E wall leads to a N-S passage protected by a guardroom with an E-W barrel vault to the N, and what are probably two murder-holes. The ground floor chamber (int. dims. 5.7m E-W; 4.75m N-S) has one slit window in the S wall, and a destroyed chamber in the W wall. The entrance passage leads to a newel stairs at the SE angle and a secondary entrance in the S wall.

      The stairs rise to the first floor under an E-W vault, entered through a pointed doorway. This floor has mural chambers in the E and W walls, that in the E wall entered from the stairs through a lintelled doorway. The E chamber has a window with a seat in the E wall an a corner light, probably with blocked gun-loops at the NE angle, but its N-S barrel vault is largely destroyed.

      There is a cross-loop, a stirrup-loop and slop stone in the stairs to the second floor, which is inaccessible, but it has mural chambers in the E and S walls, the latter with three lights, one plain, one ogee-headed, and a corner light with two two gun-loops. This chamber is vaulted, but that in the E wall is not. The third floor under an E-W vault is entered through a pointed doorway from the stairs, and has mural chambers in the E and S walls, each chamber having a barrel vault. The chamber in the E wall is entered by a lintelled doorway from the stairs. The fourth floor has no ante-chambers, but each surviving wall has a two-light, ogee-headed window. The parapet does not suvive. A garderobe chute exits the W wall at the S end, but the fireplaces must have been in the N or W walls.

      There is a stone-built building (int. dims. 12.85m E-W; 5.2m N-S) of one storey with an attic attached to the E of the tower house. This was the rectory of Templemichael (O’Connel Redmond 1918-19, 95) and it has a single dividing wall. This building also incorporated the ground floor of the tower house and re-built its doorway. At the ground floor the S stone wall (T 0.65m) has two doorways and a large window. There is a single doorway in the N wall and a window in the E wall. There are two internal doorways at the ground floor, and there is a doorway in the dividing wall in the attic. It is probably 18th century in date.

      Just 4m NE of the tower house is a circular tower (ext. diam. 5.1m; int. diam. 3.1m; H 3.7m over the bawn; ext. H 6.7m), entered through a rebuilt doorway at SW. Only one level survives with a wall recess and three embrasure, two with plain lights, the other blocked. Walls extending to the W and S may have formed the bawn wall, but they are not bonded to the tower. Daniel Grose illustrates the tower house and corner tower accurately from the 1830s (Stalley 1991, 51-3). Templemichael church site (WA037-013001-) is immediately adjacent to the W.

      O’Connell-Redmond, G. (1918-19) The castles of north-east Cork and near its borders. JCHAS 24-25, 1-6, 62-6, 93-103, 145-51.
      O’Flanagan, M. (Compiler) (1929) Letters containing information relative to the antiquities of the county of Waterford collected during the progress of the Ordnance Survey in 1841. Typescript. Bray.
      Simington, R. C. (ed.) (1942) The Civil Survey AD 1654-1656, vi, the County of Waterford. Irish Manuscripts Commission. Dublin.
      Stalley, R. (1991) Daniel Grosse (c. 1776-1838): the antiquities pf Ireland. The Irish Architectural Archive. Dublin.

      The above description is derived from the published ‘Archaeological Inventory of County Waterford’ (Dublin: Stationery Office, 1999). In certain instances the entries have been revised and updated in the light of recent research.

      Revised by: Michael Moore

      Date of upload: 07 October 2011

      Date of last visit: Tuesday, June 05, 1990

      References:

      O’Flanagan, Rev. M. (Compiler) 1929 Letters containing information relative to the antiquities of the county of Waterford collected during the progress of the Ordnance Survey in 1841. Bray.

      Simington, R.C. (ed.) 1942 The Civil survey, AD 1654-1656. Vol VI: county of Waterford. Dublin. Irish Manuscripts Commission.

      Stalley, R. (ed.) 1991 Daniel Grose (c. 1766–1838). The antiquities of Ireland, a supplement to Francis Grose. Dublin. The Irish Architectural Archive.

      CHURCH
      Description: There is a stone-built building (int. dims. 12.85m E-W; 5.2m N-S) of one storey with an attic attached to the E of the tower house (WA037-014001-) just to the E of Templemichael church (WA037-013001-). This was the rectory of Templemichael (O’Connel Redmond 1918-19, 95) and it has a single dividing wall. This building also incorporated the ground floor of the tower house and re-built its doorway. At the ground floor the S stone wall (T 0.65m) has two doorways and a large window. There is a single doorway in the N wall and a window in the E wall. There are two internal doorways at the ground floor, and there is a doorway in the dividing wall at the attic level. It is probably 18th century in date.

      O’Connell-Redmond, G. (1918-19) The castles of north-east Cork and near its borders. JCHAS 24-25, 1-6, 62-6, 93-103, 145-51.

      Compiled by: Michael Moore

      Date of upload: 01 March 2012

      Date of last visit: Friday, June

      GRAVEYARD
      Description: Located on a short promontory (dims. c. 260m E-W at S; c. 200m N-S) jutting N into the confluence of the W-E Glendine River with the N-S Blackwater River. The parish church of Templemichael (WA037-013001-) is within a rectangular graveyard (dims. c. 50m N-S; c. 45m E-W) defined by masnory walls. A tower house (WA037-014001-) is adjacent immediately to the E of the graveyard.

      Compiled by: Michael Moore

      Date of upload: 07 October 2011

      thanks so much, Eamonn,

      that is wonderful information,

      catryn

      Date: Sun, 20 Sep 2015 23:18:01 +0100
      Subject: Re: [Cork Archaeologist] Please moderate: “HOME”
      From: eocotter@gmail.com
      To: john.j.mccarthy@icloud.com
      CC: catrynpower@hotmail.com; john.j.mccarthy@ntlworld.com

      Rincrew was an Anglo-Norman manor and parish which included the places we call today Rincrew and Templemichael. The parish church of Rincrew was dedicated to St Michael. Somewhere along the line the manor was subdivided – one part retained the name Rincrew and the other, centred on the parish church, acquired the name Templemichael.
      Since Templemichael (originally Rincrew) was the site of the medieval parish church there must have been an Anglo-Norman church there and it is very likely there was also an Anglo-Norman manorial settlement nearby, where the present tower house is. This settlement could have been something like what survives at Rincrew today, or possibly a castle of some kind. I haven’t examined the area around the tower house, but there is no record of anything older than the tower house.
      Templemichael was acquired by the Earls of Desmond in the early 1400s and shortly after was granted to the Fitzgeralds of Dromana, who presumably built the tower house. They retained Templemichael at least until the Munster Plantation. It went to Raleigh and then Boyle, but I think Fitzgeralds recovered it and held it until around 1750 when they possibly sold it off.
      Eamonn Cotter

      Reply

  28. Michael Kenefick

    October 30, 2015

    Fantastic and I am hugely impressed with the quality of your English which, sadly, suffers regular modern day abuse.

    Reply

  29. Mark Malionek

    March 8, 2016

    I was interested in the Cobh area of Cork.
    Could you tell me any information about the sea caption Richard Roberts?
    My mom is a Roberts, her came came from Cork. I was wondering if we could be related.

    Reply

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